Curatorview [Alfredo Cramerotti]

Mostyn new exhibition season: Cerith Wyn Evans Opening Saturday 8 October 2022

Posted in nEws and rEleases by Curatorview on October 6, 2022
This is a major solo exhibition by Cerith Wyn Evans (b. 1958), the most widely established and internationally recognised Welsh artist working today. Cerith Wyn Evans’ (b. 1958, Llanelli) artistic practice incorporates a diverse range of media including installation, sculpture, photography, film and text. He began his career as a filmmaker, producing short, experimental films and collaborative works. Since the 1990s he has created artworks that consider language and perception, focusing with a precise clarity upon their manifestation within a space, as can be seen here throughout Mostyn’s lower and upper galleries. The works exist and take form through the reflection on and interrogation of the world about us, adopting what he identifies as “strategies of refraction…. of juxtaposition, superimposition and contradiction…occluding and revealing” to create moments of rupture within existing structures of communication, whether visual, audible or conceptual.

For this exhibition he has focused on ideas around the folds and flows of energy via material and immaterial conduits, circuitry, and choreology:- the practice of translating movement into notational form. Wyn Evans engages with the site of the gallery to produce works which question our notions of reality and cognition, of perception and subjectivity… the exhibition as a meditation, an experiment with fluid recourse to scores, maps, diagrams and models… Intricate neon sculptures interrogate the means of perception and question how we interpret the works and their spatial surroundings which are used to construct meaning. The visual assemblage presented in concert throughout the galleries unfolds in a sort of ‘controlled randomness’, in which artworks coexist in a play of exchanges between intervals and intensities. Neon works are suspended and isolated in space, seven-metre high light columns descend from the ceiling like a subliminal forest of thought, suspended windscreens are mobile, and transparent glass panes reverberate with a soundtrack defined by relations constantly in flux.

Join us this Saturday for the launch of this major presentation of place-responsive, new and adaptive of works, including sculpture, installation, light work, sound work and moving image.

Opens 8th October, 10.30am – 5.00pmTalk: Artist in Conversation
CERITH WYN EVANS
8th October, 3.00 – 4.00pm

During the launch of Cerith Wyn Evans’ major exhibition at Mostyn, Director Alfredo Cramerotti and the artist will be in conversation in the Mostyn Project Space. 
 
This discussion event will be supported with a British Sign Language Interpreter and refreshments will be served for audience members at the Oriel Cafe at 4pm.

The exhibition is curated by Alfredo Cramerotti, Director, Mostyn, with the assistance of Kalliopi Tsipni- Kolaza, Associate Curator of Visual Arts, Mostyn, Robert Grose, Exhibitions Manager, Mostyn, and Cecily Shrimpton, Head of Operations, Mostyn. The project is generously supported by the Colwinston Charitable Trust, White Cube, Marian Goodman Gallery, Dr Carol Bell, Salisbury & Co. and Ellis Williams Architects, along with core funding support from Arts Council of Wales, Conwy County Borough Council and Llandudno Town Council.

Cerith Wyn Evans would like to personally thank Pascale Berthier, Irene Bradbury, Stephen Farrer, Tom Foulsham, Lukas Galehr, Daniel Gallego, Nicola Lees, Takayuki Mashiyama, Nicolas Nahab, Ilona Noack, Jacob Noack, Stefan Rigger, Josef Schöfmann, Freyja Sewell, Jessica Simas, Robert Spragg and Johnathon Titheridge.

Acknowledgements

Who needs the Guggenheim when you’ve got MOSTYN? Interview with MOSTYN Director, Alfredo Cramerotti on Museums Journal

Posted in nEws and rEleases, shortEssays/cortiSaggi [English/Italian] by Curatorview on June 25, 2013

Who needs the Guggenheim when you’ve got MOSTYN?

Museums Journal
by Simon Stephens
18.06.2013

A recent article in The Guardian by former Plaid Cymru MP Adam Price argued that it made sense to develop a Guggenheim outpost in Wales.

After a recent visit to MOSTYN, a contemporary art gallery in Llandudno in north Wales, it seems to me that developing a Guggenheim in Wales makes no sense at all.

The idea for a Welsh Guggenheim came after Finland rejected plans for a Guggenheim in its capital Helsinki. Some of the concerns centred on the costs of developing and running the gallery. These worries could also apply to Wales.

Also, one of the locations suggested for a Guggenheim was Swansea, where the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery will reopen next year following a £6m redevelopment. The Guggenheim Foundation was not keen anyway so it seems the idea is dead in the water.

I went to MOSTYN to interview its Italian-born director Alfredo Cramerotti. Under his leadership, the gallery is combining an international exhibition programme with support for the contemporary art scene in Wales through initiatives such as the Artes Mundi visual arts exhibition and prize.

The gallery is also part of a £5m arts programme for under-25s funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

And Cramerotti hopes to address local concerns by using artists to interpret the history of the MOSTYN building, which started life in 1901 as a gallery for female artists then went through various other uses (a world war one drill hall and a piano showroom among them) before reopening as a gallery in 1979 following a campaign by a group that included the artist Kyffin Williams.

MOSTYN added an impressive extension by Ellis Williams Architects that opened in 2010. The gallery now gets about 80,000 visitors a year – and that’s in a town with 18,000 residents.

I came away from Llandudno thinking what Wales needs is another couple of MOSTYNS, not a Guggenheim.

Design accolade for Mostyn

Posted in nEws and rEleases by Curatorview on August 15, 2011

Leisure Opportunities (via Durrants media agency)

9 August 2011

Mostyn Hires a New Director

Posted in nEws and rEleases by Curatorview on August 9, 2011
ArtSmacked
by
August 2, 2011

Oriel Mostyn Hires a New Director

Photograph courtesy of QUAD / Lucas Graham Commons

Congratulations to Alfredo Cramerotti for his new appointment as Director of the Oriel Mostyn Gallery. Located in Llandudno on the north coast, Mostyn is the largest publicly funded contemporary art gallery in Wales.

Cramerotti brings a wealth of art world experience to his new position. He studied Art in Context at the Universität der Künste, Institut für Kunst im Kontext in Berlin followed by the Critical Studies Programme at the Lund University, Malmö Art Academy in Sweden.

In his current role as Senior Curator at QUAD Centre of Art, Media and Film in Derby, Cramerotti has fostered an ambitious programme of events including the launch of the FORMAT International Photography Festival.

He has authored several publications including All That Fits: The Aesthetics of Journalism which accompanies his current exhibition at QUAD. In addition to his innovative achievements at QUAD, Camerotti recently co-curated Manifesta 8, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art in Spain and the Furla Award for Contemporary Art in Italy.

Camerotti is enthusiastic about his new appointment. His aim, he says, is “to make Mostyn the place to visit for contemporary art in Wales, and the place to watch closer if you are abroad”

As Mostyn welcomes their new Director they also welcome their newly redeveloped exhibition space. In collaboration with The Arts Council of Wales, the Gallery has recently undergone a £5.1m expansion for which Ellis Williams Architects were honoured with a RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) Award.

Succeeding  Martin Barlow, who served at the Gallery’s Director for the past 14 years, Camerotti will take up his post at Mostyn in September.

Current exhibitions include Correlation featuring the work of abstract paitner, Colin Williams and Romuald Hazoumè,  a solo show featuring the work of one of Africa’s leading contemporary artists both on view until 4 September.

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