alcramer [Alfredo Cramerotti]

Curating and Social Change: Talks and workshops by Alfredo Cramerotti at British Council Hong Kong and Connecting Spaces / University of Zurich Hong Kong

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on March 25, 2017
  • Wednesday 29 March 2017, 10am

BRITISH COUNCIL Arts & Creative Industries Team

Boardroom, 7F, British Council, 3 Supreme Court Road, Admiralty, Hong Kong

Alfredo Cramerotti will give a presentation of MOSTYN’s artistic programme approach for / as social change, and of other relevant curatorial projects. Examples include co-curating the Maldives Pavilion at the 55th Venice Biennial, 2015 (centred on climate change, sustainable development and the anthropocene concept applied to everyday life), and co-curating Manifesta 8 the European contemporary art biennial, Region of Murcia, Spain, 2010 (centred on artistic production through mass media outlets i.e. TV, radio, Internet, newspapers, in order to facilitate a ‘perception shift’ of what and how art can occupy different types of space and effect social impact / change).

  • Wednesday 29 March 2017, 3pm

Connecting Space Hong Kong / Zurich University of the Arts, Postgraduate Programme in Curating / Bootes Ltd

Fort Street 18-20, Wah Kin Mansion, North Point, Hong Kong

Alfredo Cramerotti will give a presentation of MOSTYN’s institutional approach for curating at the International Curatorial Workshop “Curating and Social Change” organised by the University of Zurich in partnership with Connecting Space Hong Kong, Bootes Ltd, and the Postgraduate Programme in Curating, Center of Further Education, Zurich University of the Arts. The talk will focus on the work done in MOSTYN for the audience development initiative – the History Series.  The starting point was an exploration of the connections between contemporary art and the history of the building and of the town of Llandudno; turning the usual curatorial process of creating exhibitions on its head, MOSTYN invited its audience to actively provide their stories behind the former uses of the building and its changing status over the course of the 20th Century. The aim of the project was not to come out with exhibitions and educational programmes that were “good for them” but to actually listen to the local environment and then create exhibitions and learning activities with in-built social relevance through the work of contemporary artists.

The overall focus of the visit to Hong Kong is on how arts can create social impact / social change, using findings and insights gathered from meetings the local institutions and their relevant counterparts:
– Mapping the current curatorial practices in the UK compared to what one can observe from meetings and visits in Hong Kong
– Opportunities and challenges in Hong Kong in relation to applying contemporary arts to achieve social change / impact
– Evaluation, Measurement and Impact role when making arts and / or sustain social change / impact , both in the UK and in Hong Kong.

Interview with APT Curator Alfredo Cramerotti

Posted in nEws and rEleases, shortEssays/cortiSaggi [English/Italian] by alcramer on April 29, 2013

Alfredo Cramerotti

> Question:

What’s the most exciting part of curating at the Venice Biennale? What are your biggest challenges?

> Answer:

“In Venice everything is quite complicated, as you can imagine. So you need either to have the direct contacts or create a structure that supports you before and throughout the exhibition. This goes for planning and construction permissions, transportation, building contractors, installation of works, marketing, and even for such straightforward tasks such as hosting a party.

“Speaking Italian surely helps, in my case. On the other hand, the rewards are equally exceptional. Working in Venice is an incredibly challenging task for both artists and curators, but a feat that goes a long way. There is a lot of preparation to do, and key aspects to prioritize i.e. considering the mediation of the content, the use of the space, the circulation of the visitors, and the ways one wants the points of the artist’s project to ‘get through’.”

“All these aspects are heightened in an environment like the Venice Biennale, for both its prestige and the expectations that international attention puts on the artist.

“In 2013 I’m co-curating not only Wales but also the Maldives Pavilion (as CPS Chamber of Public Secrets), two very different set ups and frameworks; and here the fun begins. My first project in Venice goes back to 2003, when I worked for the Singapore Pavilion.”

Q:

How did you envision your role as a curator when you first started?

A:

“Fundamentally, I work to facilitate artists’ visions, and to provide them the means to realize significant and meaningful projects that can affect (and effect) people’s lives. I do believe that contemporary art it is about contemporary life, nothing less, nothing more. Artists are crucial to help understand better the life we had, we have, we will have.

“To engage our senses in ‘filtering’ the meaning of life through an artistic approach is what differentiate humans from other animals. Art can be frightening, exciting, thoughtful and miserable all at once. Making art, sharing it through relevant and specific displays, interpreting and re-opening debates on many issues via those display and reinterpretation is our business. As a curator, I take care of the last two thirds of the process.”
Q:

What do you consider to be your biggest career achievement, and why?

A:

“I am very proud of my co-curation of Manifesta 8 in Spain in 2010. And of course my directorship of MOSTYN, the leading and largest contemporary art space in Wales, UK. It is a fantastic space offering a truly international program yet retaining a strong local purpose. I am also a real enthusiast of the AGM Culture “expanded” symposium that every year happens in a different location, with a different format: exhibition, performance, debate, screening series, etc. It is helping many hosting organizations to understand better what they do and how they do it, acting as a sort of “critical friend” through the work of the artists we invite.

Q:

APT brings together some of the most talented up-and-coming artists in the art world today. Which emerging artists do you follow?

A:

I follow the work of a number of artists, some of them known already, some not yet on the main circuit of biennials, museums and auction houses. Among others: Laurent Grasso, based in Paris. Marinella Senatore, based in Berlin. Diango Hernandez, based in Frankfurt. Rossella Biscotti, based in Amsterdam. Erick Beltran, based in Barcelona. Haris Epaminonda, based in Berlin. Bedwyr Williams, based in Caernarfon. David Jablonowski, based in Amsterdam. Francesco Arena, based in Cassano delle Murge. Stefano Tsivopolous, based in Amsterdam. Uriel Orlow, based in London. Shannon Ebner, based in New York. Hiwa K., based in Berlin. Julieta Aranda, based in Berlin. Anibal Lopez, based in Guatemala City. Rabih Mroure, based in Beirut. Flavio Favelli, based in Bologna. Sean Edwards, based in Abergavenny. Rosa Barba, based in Berlin. Asier Mendizabal, based in Bilbao. Rä di Martino, based in London. Broomberg & Chanarin, based in London.
Q:

Why did you join APT and why is your role important to the artistic community?

A:
“I joined APT to facilitate and help the work of artists, and also to support them as much as I can throughout their life.

“I invite artists whom I trust, I trust their work, and I am confident they will have a major impact in the art sphere of the decades to come. It’s an exciting perspective, and a rare chance to make a difference in the society one lives. So I am quite accustomed to having a long-term view on things and scenarios. If I can offer this expertise and insights to a number of artists, that makes me happy. And I can make them happy too.”

Q:

What’s your typical day like? What do you like doing outside of work?

A:

“What do you mean outside work?! Every day is long, and so far, still fun. I embrace what a famous American female CEO recently stated: forget the balance; this is the merge. ‘The merge’ is when work and life mesh up and intersperse each other throughout the day. I get up at 7.00am and go to bed at 10.00pm, and in between everything and anything can happen.

“It could be cuddling and feeding my daughter, preparing my older boy for school, coordinating a meeting on email, reading an essay for a presentation, writing a foreword or browsing the portfolio of an artist for the emergent artists program in MOSTYN.

“And we do have family meals daily. At home I might be discussing my wife’s next textile design brief for her looming deadline, playing ‘explorers’ with my son in the living room, babysitting the little one while my wife is replying to her emails – she also merges a lot of things, many more than me.

“Before the evening is over I may have an update on the photo book series I’m editing with a few emails or calls to the various authors and the publisher’s headquarters. Finally, going to bed only to be woken up by my girl after two hours. She’s only two months old. It can only get better.

“Really, there is no ‘outside work’, as there is no ‘outside life’. There is family, private life, public life, curating, writing, management, researching, coaching and creativity all at once.”

Q:

What’s the most interesting upcoming exhibition at MOSTYN?

A:

“The vision of MOSTYN is to open up debates about contemporary life through contemporary art. We have characterized the program by two strands:

“The first looks at the history of the MOSTYN building and its situation in the Victorian town of Llandudno, North Wales. With the Visual Arts Programme Curator Adam Carr we have developed an idea for a sequence of four exhibitions based on the former use of the building and the principles on which it was founded.

“Women’s Art Society looks at the period when MOSTYN was an important place for women to exhibit their art. Women were often denied membership of local art societies on the basis of their gender.

“WAR I & II focuses on the use of the building during the two World Wars; as a drill hall in World War I and in World War II it was occupied by the Inland Revenue as their temporary headquarters.

“MAIL investigates the building’s expansion into the former Royal Mail Sorting Office, and Wagstaff explores the use of the building as a shop / store for pianos.”

“The second strand is concerned with re-evaluating models and approaches of exhibition making and the understanding of classic art genres. The program will comprise solo exhibitions accompanied by related group exhibitions and vice versa. As an example, Y O U that brings together the work of five international artists (Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Aurélien Froment, Jeppe Hein, Július Koller and Rivane Neuenschwander) including pieces that directly request and require you, the viewer, and your involvement.

“Dear Portrait will look at the seemingly faded relevance of portraiture, aiming to update and renew its status. All of the artworks included, by a group of international artists, will be accompanied by texts written by the people depicted in the works.

“Return Journey is an exhibition that aims to enable audiences to open out their view of United Kingdom in connection with the visual arts. It asks instead, and hopes to provide an answer for; what is it to live and work in the United Kingdom, what delineates its land, and in what ways can it be used to form the basis for a work of art?

“There are also a number of solo exhibitions. Among others, Keith Arnatt (Spring 2013), Franco Vaccari (Summer 2013), Nina Beier (Autumn 2013), Tom Wood (Winter 2013), and solo shows for the ‘Uprisings’ program of emergent artists in a dedicated gallery at the first floor: we kick off with Alek O, followed by Becca Volecker.”

original interview here

Alfredo Cramerotti: curating across disciplines

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on October 16, 2012

Alfredo Cramerotti, Director of Mostyn, Wales, and next co-curator of the Wales in Venice Pavilion 2013 will give a talk about his curatorial work across different disciplines, and will revisit his endeavour of art & media curating for Manifesta 8, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art which took place in the region of Murcia, Spain, in 2010.

2pm, Tuesday 16 October 2012

H6, Rathmell Building,
Caerleon Campus
Newport
NP18 3QT

Alfredo Cramerotti is a writer, curator and artist based in the UK.  His cultural practice explores the relationship between reality and representation across a variety of media and collaborations such as TV, radio, publishing, internet, media festivals, photography, writing and exhibition curating.  Cramerotti is Director of Mostyn, the leading publicly funded contemporary art gallery in Wales, and was co-curator of Manifesta 8, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art (2009-2010) and Senior Curator, QUAD Derby (2008-2011).  He co-directs AGM Culture, roaming curatorial agency; CPS Chamber of Public Secrets, media and art production unit and is Visiting Lecturer in various European universities among others NTU Nottingham Trent University, University of Westminster and DAI Dutch Arts Institute. Cramerotti is also Editor of the Critical Photography book series by Intellect Books, and his own recent publications include Aesthetic Journalism: How to inform without informing (2009) and Unmapping the City: Perspectives of Flatness (2010).

Aesthetic Journalism: How to Inform Without Informing @ Corner College, Zurich, Switzerland

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on May 4, 2012

Lecture
Aesthetic Journalism
How to Inform Without Informing
Alfredo Cramerotti

04.05.2012
20,00 Uhr

Italian writer, curator and artist Alfredo Cramerotti will give an introduction in his book “Aesthetic Journalism: How to Inform Without Informing”. Recognising the “blurring of margins between artistic and information practices” as a main feature in contemporary culture, Cramerotti sets out the Who, What, Where, When and How, and Why of Aesthetic Journalism.

Cramerotti identifies this “’investigative approach” in contemporary art and photography as the use of fieldwork, reportage, interviews, document analysis, graphic mapping and information distribution. He cites a number of artists who employ these strategies: Hans Haacke, Martha Rosler, Lukas Einsele, Laura Horelli, Renzo Martens, Alfredo Jaar, Renée Green, The Atlas Group/Walid Raad and Bruno Serralongue. For Cramerotti, Aesthetic Journalism implies the critical use of documentary techniques and journalistic methods where the medium itself undergoes questioning. He posits that aesthetics, understood as a “process in which we open up our sensibility to the diversity of the forms of nature (and manmade environment)” can open up the mechanisms of art and media to expose the limitations of photojournalism, documentation and the ethics of representation. In doing so, Aesthetic Journalism renders productive readings of reality, information, fact, fiction and objectivity.

The concepts outlined in the book have been a key tool in the development of the Chamber of Public Secrets’ curatorial approach for the 8th edition of Manifesta, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art: Manifesta 8 taking place in the region of Murcia, Spain.

Alfredo Cramerotti: The Future of MOSTYN

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on March 12, 2012

Alfredo Cramerotti, Director of Mostyn, Wales, will give a talk about his future vision for the gallery.
5pm, 14 March 2012

H6, Rathmell Building,
Caerleon Campus
Newport
NP18 3QT

Alfredo Cramerotti is a writer, curator and artist based in the UK.  His cultural practice explores the relationship between reality and representation across a variety of media and collaborations such as TV, radio, publishing, internet, media festivals, photography, writing and exhibition curating.  Cramerotti is Director of Mostyn, the largest publicly funded contemporary art gallery in Wales, and was co-curator of Manifesta 8, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art (2009-2010) and Senior Curator, QUAD Derby (2008-2011).  He co-directs AGM Culture, roaming curatorial agency; CPS Chamber of Public Secrets, media and art production unit and is Visiting Lecturer in various European universities among others NTU Nottingham Trent University, University of Westminster and DAI Dutch Arts Institute. Cramerotti is also Editor of the Critical Photography book series by Intellect Books, and his own recent publications include Aesthetic Journalism: How to inform without informing (2009) and Unmapping the City: Perspectives of Flatness (2010).

Links
http://www.alcramer.net
http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/books/view-Series,id=19/
http://www.mostyn.org

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on August 17, 2011

WOOLOO
Newsletter Aug 3 2011    
Latest News

Mostyn Hires a New Director

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on August 9, 2011
ArtSmacked
by
August 2, 2011

Oriel Mostyn Hires a New Director

Photograph courtesy of QUAD / Lucas Graham Commons

Congratulations to Alfredo Cramerotti for his new appointment as Director of the Oriel Mostyn Gallery. Located in Llandudno on the north coast, Mostyn is the largest publicly funded contemporary art gallery in Wales.

Cramerotti brings a wealth of art world experience to his new position. He studied Art in Context at the Universität der Künste, Institut für Kunst im Kontext in Berlin followed by the Critical Studies Programme at the Lund University, Malmö Art Academy in Sweden.

In his current role as Senior Curator at QUAD Centre of Art, Media and Film in Derby, Cramerotti has fostered an ambitious programme of events including the launch of the FORMAT International Photography Festival.

He has authored several publications including All That Fits: The Aesthetics of Journalism which accompanies his current exhibition at QUAD. In addition to his innovative achievements at QUAD, Camerotti recently co-curated Manifesta 8, the European Biennial of Contemporary Art in Spain and the Furla Award for Contemporary Art in Italy.

Camerotti is enthusiastic about his new appointment. His aim, he says, is “to make Mostyn the place to visit for contemporary art in Wales, and the place to watch closer if you are abroad”

As Mostyn welcomes their new Director they also welcome their newly redeveloped exhibition space. In collaboration with The Arts Council of Wales, the Gallery has recently undergone a £5.1m expansion for which Ellis Williams Architects were honoured with a RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architects) Award.

Succeeding  Martin Barlow, who served at the Gallery’s Director for the past 14 years, Camerotti will take up his post at Mostyn in September.

Current exhibitions include Correlation featuring the work of abstract paitner, Colin Williams and Romuald Hazoumè,  a solo show featuring the work of one of Africa’s leading contemporary artists both on view until 4 September.

New Director at Mostyn

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on August 1, 2011

The Pioneer

21st July 2011

Non mi interessa Luca Rossi in sé, ma Luca Rossi in me

Posted in nEws and rEleases, shortEssays/cortiSaggi [English/Italian] by alcramer on May 2, 2011

by Alfredo Cramerotti

Artribune
27 Aprile 2011

(Italian)

SKUG: Manifesta 8 Review

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on February 24, 2011

SKUG / artfile

January 2011

by Roland Schöny

(in German)

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