alcramer [Alfredo Cramerotti]

A new Season of Exhibitions at MOSTYN

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on November 16, 2017

A New Season of Exhibitions at MOSTYN
FRIDAY 17 NOVEMBER 2017 – 6.30pm onwards

EVGENY ANTUFIEV

Organic resistance: body and knife, crossing the border

18 November 2017 – 18 February 2018

image 1.jpg

The first UK solo exhibition by Russian born Antufiev, presents artefacts, ideas and stories collected from, or imagined by, local and mythological cultures from different parts of the world.

The exhibition is organised in partnership with Collezione Maramotti in Reggio Emilia (Italy), where the artist had a major survey of his work in 2013 – the first one in Italy. The Maramotti Collection has continued to follow the research of the artist by acquiring new works over the last few years, and this exhibition will be the first time the works will be shown outside Europe.

This exhibition has been curated by Alfredo Cramerotti, Director, MOSTYN, and will be presented alongside Miles of Creativity, an exhibition curated by Adam Carr, Visual Arts Programme Curator, MOSTYN.
See full exhibition description here.

 

MILES OF CREATIVITY 
18 November 2017 – 18 February 2018

image 2.jpg

 

Featuring creatives:
Beacon Garage, Trish Bermingham, Lin Cummins, Wendy Dawson, Tim Dickinson, Glyn Ellis, Nick Elphick, Julia S. Greaves, Lizzie Hughes, Mark Hughes, Anna Jones, Richard Cynan Jones, Patrick Joseph, Judith Bond Cakes, Barry Morris, North Wales Vapour, Pea J. Restall, Miguel Roque, Mike Ryder, Alana Tyson, Alan Whitfield, Wild Horse Brewery, Emrys Williams, Gwyn Williams, Susan Williams, Sandra Wynne 

Miles of Creativity is a group exhibition that explores the creative act and its relationship to the town of Llandudno, and brings together work by artists and by creative people working in trades not traditionally shown in an art gallery.

This exhibition has been curated by Adam Carr, Visual Arts Programme Curator, MOSTYN.

See full exhibition description here.

 

Gallery 6
John Hedley
Natural Forms 
24 October – 28 January 2018
image 3.jpg

Our series of solo exhibitions celebrating contemporary printmaking continues in Gallery 6 with Anglesey based John Hedley.

All prints are for sale framed or unframed, and the Collectorplan scheme allows you to buy unique pieces of contemporary art and craft over a period of 12 months interest free.

 

This exhibition has been curated by Barry Morris, Retail Manager, MOSTYN.

See full exhibition description here.

 

Advertisements

Daily Post: End of an era for Llandudno post office

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on May 7, 2017

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/end-era-llandudno-post-office-12240188

As postal services move to a new venue in the town, former workers share fond memories of the Vaughan Street site

ken-jones-ex-postman-Mostyn-Gallery-Llandudno

The mail being wheeled along the road outside Bunneys Corner in Mostyn Street Llandudno

For more than a hundred years the grand post office on Vaughan Street served the people of Llandudno.

Its closure just weeks ago marked the end of an era for the seaside town – now customers will have to use the service in WHSmith on Mostyn Street.

The old post office was opened in 1902 next to MOSTYN art gallery.

Following its demise the gallery has put on an exhibition about the postal service, with workers sharing their stories alongside work by contemporary artists.

Ken Jones, one of the last telegram boys in the town took part in the We’ve Got Mail III exhibition.

He became a postman just as the seven-week strike began in 1971 – part of his job was to help clear the huge backlog of mail when the protest was over.

ken-jones-ex-postman

Items on show in Mostyn from the old post office

Ken told the Daily Post: “I’d left school when I was 15 and followed my dad John Henry Jones into the Royal Mail.

“He also started as a telegram boy in Llandudno, and when he was older he was transferred to Llangollen.

“He used to tell us stories about how he was given a dozen eggs and cups of tea on his rounds.”

Ken clearly enjoyed working for Royal Mail for 42 years.

When a telegram arrived from the Queen for a 100th birthday, postmen had to phone Buckingham Palace to confirm it had been delivered to the recipient.

“I had a telegram for an address in Craigside, Llandudno, which was strange as I knew the house was empty,” remembers Ken.

Ken knocked at the door and an old lady answered.

“She told me that she’d asked her residential home to let her wake up in her own bed for her 100 birthday.” said Ken.

Another memorable day for Ken was when he was driving around Penrhynside a little too fast.

ken-jones-ex-postman-Mostyn-Gallery-Llandudno-2

Gwyn Hughes (pictured) learnt to ride a bicycle on the one used by his uncle Thomas Ieuan Hughes when he was a telegram boy. Gwyn remembers riding on the red bike through the cornfields near Llanrhos

“The thing with Penrhynside is that it’s a small village with many chapels and a couple of pubs.

“Whenever one of the chapels went on one of their annual day trips to Blackpool or somewhere those that went wrote postcards to the rest of the village so I was stuck delivering all these postcards even though they’d only been to Southport for the day.

“One Saturday I was in the Royal Mail van and was speeding a little too fast around the narrow lanes of Penrhynside as I wanted to get home to play football.

“I lost control and ended up putting the van on top of somebody’s roof.

“The owner was in the bath at the time and had a bit of a shock.”

ken-jones-ex-postman-Mostyn-Gallery-Llandudno-3

Post office whist drive and dance at the St Georges Hotel in 1937

Ken said he enjoyed the camaraderie of working for the service.

He said: “One of the funniest days was when we had a damaged packet that turned out to be full of live locusts, they were destined for an owner of a snake.

“And even though all the locusts had gone, I still had to deliver the package.

“When the person asked what had happened to them, I told him he was very welcome to come down to the sorting office and catch them, as they were hanging off the ceiling lights and jumping all over the place.”

Coverage of We’ve Got Mail III Exhibition in Print:

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 9.56.24 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 9.56.39 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 9.56.53 PM

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 9.57.13 PM.png

NEW SEASON at MOSTYN: WAGSTAFF’S

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on February 16, 2017

this-americans-top-40-2012-part-i-with-floor-300_edit_website

Dave Muller, This American’s Top 40 (2012) Part I, 2013. Acrylic on paper.
Trwy garedigrwydd yr artist a ‘The Approach’, London. Courtesy the artist and The Approach, London.

WAGSTAFF’S

18 February25 June 2017

Participating artists: Zarouhie Abdalian, Saâdane Afif, Cory Arcangel, John Baldessari, Simeon Barclay, Alex Bartsch, Jacqueline Bebb, Andrea Büttner, Anne Collier, Claire Fontaine, Mario García Torres, Charles Gershom, Rebecca Gould, Gareth Griffith, Scott King, Adam McEwen, Dave Muller, Fernando Ortega, Hannah Rickards, Torbjørn Rødland, Anri Sala, Fabrice Samyn, Santo Tolone
and
Historical presentations relating to Wagstaff’s store and the town of Llandudno

WAGSTAFF’S takes as its point of departure a piano and musical instrument dealership of the same name that occupied the current MOSTYN building in the years prior to its being reinstated as an art gallery in the 1970s.

Originally based in Manchester, Wagstaff’s relocated to number 1 Vaughan Street in Llandudno in the early 1940s after the city store was demolished during World War II, and in 1946 it moved to number 12, site of MOSTYN, Wales today. The establishment of music shops such as Wagstaff’s in the late 19th century reflected the high regard in which music was held in terms of entertainment inside and outside the family home. Many of these shops have now gone out of business due to changes in both technology and family leisure pursuits.

WAGSTAFF’S considers the long-standing connection between music and art, and records an interpretation from today’s perspective. A number of the artists featured in the exhibition have previously appeared together in shows which have surveyed the linkage between the genre of music and the field of art. In this sense, the exhibition suggests some of music’s most embraced and debated facets; the cover version, the copy, and the culture of bootlegging.

The exhibition is presented within a format made up of four categories, taking inspiration from independent music record shops, which would categorise music by genre and which, along with musical instrument shops, have decreased in number. The categories are designed to give structure to the wide array of approaches and usages of music in the visual arts, many of which are presented in the exhibition. The format also allows opportunities for overlaps and mixes to be played out between the categories, and the artworks presented within.

This exhibition is part of MOSTYN’s History Series* which, since 2013, has examined the heritage of MOSTYN’s building, the town of Llandudno and links further afield. The series has presented historical artefacts and images alongside works by contemporary artists, thus forming a dialogue between past and present. This exhibition is curated by Adam Carr, (Visual Arts Programme Curator, MOSTYN), with historical research by Jane Matthews (Engagement Manager/Research, MOSTYN) and Richard Cynan Jones (Operations and Facitilies/Research, MOSTYN).

Special Event:

WAGSTAFF’S Exhibition preview evening

A night of live music and contemporary art
17 February 2017, 6:30pm

Join us to celebrate the opening of WAGSTAFF’S, a new group exhibition based on the piano and musical instrument shop which occupied the MOSTYN building from the 1940s to the early 1980s.

Music, in partnership with CEG, from Magi Tudur (Welsh singer/songwriter) and Paul Green (contemporary folk singer/songwriter/guitarist) in our licensed bar and cafe.

It’s FREE and everyone is welcome!
After show event, with surprise guest entertainment, at 3rdSpace at Great Orme Brewery, Llandudno from 9pm.

Press coverage for MOSTYN exhibitions: Diango Hernandez, Iwan Lewis and WAR II

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on July 10, 2016

 

Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen

Diango Hernández in conversation with Alfredo Cramerotti

1 July 2016

Download PDF: Conversation

 

 

Planet Magazine Issue 221

by Jen Loffman

1 June 2016

 

 

Contemporary Art Daily

Diango Hernández at Mostyn

5 May 2016

Download PDF: CONTEMPORARY ART DAILY_Diango Hernandez

Link: Diango Hernández at MOSTYN

 

 

Daily News: What’s On / Q&A

15 April 2016

DailyPost_CatrinMenai

Daily News: What’s On / Q&A

1 April 2016

Pierino Algeri

 

a-n Artist’s Information Company

21 March 2016

a-n Iwan Lewis

 

Daily News: What’s On / Q&A

18 March 2016

20160318_iwan lewis

 

Arts Newsletter

by David Brown

March 2016

 

Arts Newsletter 2016 - 03 - March 2

 

Weekly News

25 February 2016

Link: http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/llandudno-exhibition-tells-story-father-10930386

 

MOUSSE

9 February 2016

Link: http://moussemagazine.it/diego-hernandez-war-ii-mostyn-2016/

 

 

CURA Magazine

3 February 2016

Link: http://curamagazine.com/tips/war-ii/

 

 

Culture24

by Kate McNab

4 January 2016

Culture24

 

ATP Diary – Interview with Adam Carr – WAR II, MOSTYN, Llandudno

by Matteo Mottin

30 December 2015

Link: http://atpdiary.com/adam-carr-war-ii-mostyn-exhibits/

 

 

Weekly News

9 December 2015

 

 

ITV News

by Ian Lang

7 December 2015

ITV news_warII

Llandudno gallery celebrates its American GI history

An exhibition’s being launched to celebrate the role of a north Wales resort in hosting thousands of American service personnel in the Second World War.

The Mostyn building – now an art gallery – provided food and recreation for American troops living in Llandudno, a complete contrast to the building’s use as a drill hall in the First World War.

Watch Ian Lang‘s report:

http://www.itv.com/news/wales/update/2015-12-07/llandudno-gallery-celebrates-its-american-gi-history/

 

NW Pioneer & Welsh Coastal Life

11 November 2015

 

 

The Seen Journal No.1

TIME ISLANDS AND SPACE ISLANDS: Diango Hernández in conversation with Alfredo Cramerotti

01 October 2015

Download PDF: THE-SEEN-Issue-01-Diango-Hernandez-Alfredo-Cramerotti

Dear Portrait exhibition reviews on The Guardian & We Heart

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on September 13, 2013

Y O U at MOSTYN, Llandudno – Exhibition review in MOUSSE Magazine

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on July 16, 2013

“Y O U” at MOSTYN, Llandudno

July 7~2013

MOUSSE Magazine

 

04_RN

Rivane Neuenschwander, […], 2005

 

03_JK

Július Koller, J.K. – Ping-Pong Club (U.F.O.), 1970 – 2007

 

As the inaugural exhibition of MOSTYN’s new programme of exhibitions, “Y O U” addresses, and dialogues with, the time in which it takes place. It brings together works by five international artists that invite or require your involvement, aiming to create close relationships with you, the audience.

“Y O U” engages you in ways that you may not be accustomed to in relation to your experience of artworks and exhibitions to date.  As it responds to you, and is subject to perpetual change and re-order in accordance to your activity, it challenges conventional codes of behaviour in the context of a gallery space.

While the exhibition considers the art historical background of the relationship between artwork and viewer, and its growing status over time, it asks, how do these works engage and forge relationships with audiences in distinctively different ways from any other works of art? How is the role of the viewer elevated and placed into the centre uniquely? Through exhibiting artworks that engender such questions,”Y O U” hopes to build an alliance between you, the artwork and MOSTYN itself.

In addition to the artworks on view is a display by the School of Psychology, Bangor University comprising cultural artifacts, documents and other items showing the connection between physical objects and our cognition.  In so doing, the intention is to place the artworks by the participating artists in a broader cultural and contextual field, and enlarge upon our engagement with, and perception of, objects in general.

This exhibition is accompanied by a solo presentation of the work of Keith Arnatt and is the first set of exhibitions of MOSTYN’s new programme, curated by Adam Carr, Visual Arts Programme Curator at MOSTYN, Llandudno (North Wales, UK).

12_FGT1
Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Untitled (Revenge), 1991
02_JH
Jeppe Hein, Upside Down, 2011
10_AF
Aurélien Froment, Debuilding, 2001

Regional arts venues: less out in the sticks, more out on a limb

Posted in nEws and rEleases, shortEssays/cortiSaggi [English/Italian] by alcramer on July 14, 2013

Running an arts space outside the city is challenging but, once you realise the range of your potential audience, rewarding too

Guardian Professional
5 July 2013

by Alfredo Cramerotti
Sliced Eye, Rubiks Cube, Flawless Skin, Cardiac Muscle Cell, Orion Nebula-M42, Snow Crystal, 2012

MOSTYN works to find imaginative solutions that draw in national and international visitors (even journalists) while retaining strong links with their local audience. Pictured work by Nikolaus Schletterer. Photograph: Nikolaus Schletterer/MOSTYN

 

As anyone who has worked in the sector will tell you, running an arts space outside major cities is a hugely rewarding experience, not least because of the challenges that arise from reaching out to an audience in ways that can’t rely on a ready-made critical mass of potential visitors in the immediate area.

MOSTYN is Wales‘ largest gallery dedicated to contemporary art with an audience of roughly 80,000 per year, but being located in the 18,000-strong Victorian sea town of Llandudno and surrounded by a predominately rural area brings with it issues that an equivalent metropolitan space might not need to consider so carefully.

Another part of the challenge is encouraging journalists to visit. The three hours direct train from central London is less an issue than the bias towards reviews focusing on galleries and events in the bigger cities. Obviously there is a responsibility for media to cover stories of interest to as wide an audience as possible, but responses range from “I don’t know where I’d put it” (the same review pages you would put any show on) to “we’re fully booked up covering a major event”.

It’s not that these exhibitions or events don’t warrant media attention, but major institutions and blockbuster events hardly need the publicity to encourage public interest.

So, how are we tackling these issues? Like many other organisations reliant on quality of programming, audience engagement, media coverage and visits to secure funding, we are working on finding imaginative solutions that draw in national and international visitors (even journalists) while retaining strong links with our local audience.

A key element of this is an ambitious curatorial programme featuring world known artists from Wolfgang Tillmans to Elizabeth Peyton. We’ve also initiated a major international exhibition programme including co-curating this year’s Wales in Venice show at the 55th Venice Biennale with Oriel Davies Gallery and the Arts Council Wales – an incredible platform for all involved.

Upcoming shows will draw on our history by inviting artists to indirectly respond, through their work, to the history of the MOSTYN building which has gone from being a gallery for female artists when it launched in 1901 to a WW1 drill hall and piano storage, before returning to a gallery space in 1979.

Partnership is a vital part of our engagement work, showcased by linking with initiatives such as the Artes Mundi visual arts exhibition and prize, the biggest in the UK at £40,000. We are also part of Plus Tate, a major UK network which includes 20 contemporary art organisations outside London.

Building on the success of last year’s Plus Tate-funded Ninjas initiative for 11 to 13-year-olds, we successfully applied to be one of five national partners to be part of Tate’s Circuit programme, a national youth network for the visual arts. Funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Cylch/Circuit seeks to spark a long-term transformation in the way that young people aged 15 to 25 engage with art and take control of their own learning.

The demographic here is older on average than in cities, and we are developing ways to include those who might not normally visit a contemporary art gallery through exhibitions and events which have a cross-art form approach.

For example, our current show YOU is a conceptually strong group show (Felix Gonzalez Torres, Aurélien Froment, Jeppe Hein, Július Koller, Rivane Neuenschwander) that questions the idea of what art is: the viewer ‘produces’ the artwork through their visit. It’s had an amazing response from families who would never think to visit an art gallery, lured in with an event outside the venue during the Llandudno Victorian Extravaganza when the town was heaving with visitors.

On a marketing level, besides the reviews and articles on specialised art press, particularly helpful are features on magazines, blogs and websites such as ThisIsTomorrow and WeHeart since they are bringing MOSTYN out into the eyeline of the style and culture conscious nationally and internationally.

What have we learned that might be useful for other organisations in a similar situation? Surely, understanding that an organisation such as ours does not have a single, cohesive public but multiple audiences (including our staff, not to forget) who demand attention and have different ways of engaging.

This is not to say that we have to please everyone, but we do have to have a firm strategic direction and a flexible range of delivery via the three main areas of exhibitions, engagement and learning – equally important and each with a dedicated curator and budget.

It’s also crucial to seek and establish a range of platforms and partners that match our values and make the most of our programme in space and time: from local residents, schools and higher education to wider partnerships across the country and abroad.

It’s a long-term strategy, and long-term planning matters for our exhibitions, partnerships and funding agreements alike. Currently we are planning well into 2017 but potentially, a cultural institution like a gallery should look into society 20 or 50 years from now and then work back.

 

Alfredo Cramerotti is the director of MOSTYN contemporary art gallery in Llandudno – follow it on Twitter @MOSTYN_Wales_

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional.

Who needs the Guggenheim when you’ve got MOSTYN? Interview with MOSTYN Director, Alfredo Cramerotti on Museums Journal

Posted in nEws and rEleases, shortEssays/cortiSaggi [English/Italian] by alcramer on June 25, 2013

Who needs the Guggenheim when you’ve got MOSTYN?

Museums Journal
by Simon Stephens
18.06.2013

A recent article in The Guardian by former Plaid Cymru MP Adam Price argued that it made sense to develop a Guggenheim outpost in Wales.

After a recent visit to MOSTYN, a contemporary art gallery in Llandudno in north Wales, it seems to me that developing a Guggenheim in Wales makes no sense at all.

The idea for a Welsh Guggenheim came after Finland rejected plans for a Guggenheim in its capital Helsinki. Some of the concerns centred on the costs of developing and running the gallery. These worries could also apply to Wales.

Also, one of the locations suggested for a Guggenheim was Swansea, where the Glynn Vivian Art Gallery will reopen next year following a £6m redevelopment. The Guggenheim Foundation was not keen anyway so it seems the idea is dead in the water.

I went to MOSTYN to interview its Italian-born director Alfredo Cramerotti. Under his leadership, the gallery is combining an international exhibition programme with support for the contemporary art scene in Wales through initiatives such as the Artes Mundi visual arts exhibition and prize.

The gallery is also part of a £5m arts programme for under-25s funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation.

And Cramerotti hopes to address local concerns by using artists to interpret the history of the MOSTYN building, which started life in 1901 as a gallery for female artists then went through various other uses (a world war one drill hall and a piano showroom among them) before reopening as a gallery in 1979 following a campaign by a group that included the artist Kyffin Williams.

MOSTYN added an impressive extension by Ellis Williams Architects that opened in 2010. The gallery now gets about 80,000 visitors a year – and that’s in a town with 18,000 residents.

I came away from Llandudno thinking what Wales needs is another couple of MOSTYNS, not a Guggenheim.

Keith Arnatt, Alek O. and Y O U exhibitions on Guardian Guide

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on May 13, 2013

Guardian Guide

Friday 3 May 2013

Robert Clark find out what’s happening in art around the country

guardian_arnatt

Art Fund: Top ten coastal galleries and museums

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on August 14, 2012

Art Fund Newsletter

29 June 2011

This summer, why not beat the beach crowds and visit some of our favourite cultural attractions on the coast? From dazzling modern architecture and world-class contemporary art collections to captivating maritime history and a fantasy castle packed to the brim with spellbinding objects, using your National Art Pass has never been so inspired:

Mostyn Gallery, Wales
(free to all)

You may not expect to find Wales’ leading contemporary museum in the beautiful seaside town of Llandudno in Wales, nor may you expect to find the stunning new architecture that lay behind the gallery’s impressive 1901 terracotta façade.  Wales’s leading contemporary museum is set in the beautiful seaside town of Llandudno: a striking gallery set in a striking landscape, where old and new buildings have been merged into one harmonious design by architect Dominic Williams.

Don’t miss it! Although Mostyn does not have a permanent collection, the venue’s five galleries aim to showcase the best contemporary art produced in Wales and in turn bring to Wales some of the most exciting international art. Exhibitions change every couple of months and vary from large-scale shows to small projects and video projections.

Visitor information

MOSTYN Café ramps up the offering with a sea-view and light installation by Gavin Fraser of the noted lighting architects foto-ma. The licensed café offers dishes based on locally-sourced produce including home-made cakes. No modern gallery would be complete without a shop, and MOSTYN displays contemporary craft from around the United Kingdom, as well as books and cards.  Don’t forget to explore the superb seaside town of Landudno and the famous Great Orme Tramway which takes you to the top of the Great Orme and dates right back to 1902.

Mostyn Gallery 12 Vaughan Street, Llandudno LL30 1AB 01492 879201 www.mostyn.org

Entry details

Free to all

Open daily, 10.30am – 5pm

 

%d bloggers like this: