alcramer [Alfredo Cramerotti]

For the Love of Air Liquid

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on April 29, 2018

acramerotti april exhibition

Opening exhibition 18th – 30th April 2018, Chamber of Public Secrets’ new media art production and exhibition space, Media Art Research Center (MARC), Antalya

Fernissage 18th April 2018 at 17:00 – 19:00
Artists: Ferhat Ozgur,  Stefano Cagol, Ursula Biemann, Oliver Ressler, Khaled Ramadan and Hanna Ljungh
Curated by Khaled Ramadan and Alfredo Cramerotti

 

For the love of air liquid
Water’s impact on human happiness

I his book, Blue Mind, biologist Wallace J. Nichols published the surprising science showing how being near, in, on, or under water can make us happier, healthier, more connected and better at what we do.
Nichols analyzes the emotional, behavioral, psychological and physical connections that keep humans so mesmerized by water. He studies seas and oceans, lakes and rivers, and even swimming pools, and urges people to get closer to water if they wish to change their neurological, psychological and emotional experiences. Nichols draws on science, art, and narrative, as well as plenty of experience, to explain his blue mind in detail. Not just what it is, but how we can enter into this state, and, perhaps most importantly, why we should do so.

In order to know why water is one of our sources of happiness, or even a source of misery, we need to observe and analyze a very complex social science in conjunction with natural science: human relation to nature and the natural.
When we intend to shape nature, it changes and influences our living conditions. Due to this out-of-balance climatological interrelationship several vital elements of our survival are being affected. Water is becoming scarcer in some parts of the world while in other parts people suffer from the extra quantities of water falling from the sky or pumping from underneath.

In the scenarios of the world’s water bodies, only 3 percent of the water on the earth’s surface is fresh and drinkable, while 97 percent of the water is salty. The 3 percent fresh water is shared amongst the billions of the world’s population. Water shortage will soon hit cities and towns across the world, and the problem is increasing as populations are increasing. Industrialization and pollution are causing damage, and the greenhouse effect is having a negative impact, which leads to climate change that directly affects water sources. In an increasingly crowded and congested world, water supply has become scarcer and more contaminated.

Waste from industries and human settlements in most underdeveloped countries are drained into rivers and seas, leading to dying oceans. A good example of this is the Mediterranean Sea. Another example is one of Asia’s longest rivers, the Mekong River, where thousands of people have settled by the riverbank. The same analogy can be applied to the Nile River in Africa and to other rivers across the world. Lakes, rivers, seas and oceans used to be a source of human happiness and prosperity, but mass contamination, overfishing, and water scarcity have reduced many of them to transportation highways.

The exhibition,For the Love of Air Liquid, presents an opportunity to address the issue of water in a time of a crashing climate. The works of the invited artists examine our fascination with the water scene in detail. They are dedicated to helping us understand and enjoy a selection of contemporary art that provides inspiration and knowledge.

Curators
Khaled Ramadan and Alfredo Cramerotti

More information here.

Modes of Curating / Curating as Research

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on January 24, 2018

Curatorial study day led by Alfredo Cramerotti at GSA – The Glasgow School of Art

31 January 2018

GSA-logo-black

I conceive and understand “research” as a form of curating – namely, organizing connections and defining touchstones in contemporary visual culture by means of my work as a writer, speaker and visual project organizer – developing a discourse, or a statement through works of art, which of course can also overwhelm or enhance the project’s rationale.

In the course of this research, I have found myself working in a combination of modes, according to the various tasks I set myself. Sometimes taking a more authorial role and developing concepts and frameworks, some others becoming a conduit for ideas not mine, but translated and transformed by the visual authors I was working with. Thus, as a curator, I have acted as meta-artist; the work undertaken is less about the “what” and more about the “how”.

 

PART ONE

The Curator as Meta-Artist.

Presentation of three curatorial drafts recently delivered by Cramerotti: Michael Takeo Magruder’s De-Coding the Apocalypse at the King’s College Cultural Institute London (2015), Marinella Senatore’s The School of Narrative Dance at MOSTYN (2016), and Shezad Dawood’s Leviathan at Palazzina Canonica / Fortuny Factory Venice (2017). An insight into the research involved in developing the various themes and approaches for these exhibitions, the conversation with the artists, the solutions in relation to the spaces, and the mediation tools adopted in each case.

 

 

PART TWO

The Social, Humanitarian, Historical, Scientific, Logistics as Art.

Participants are invited to discuss and present to the group their views / answers to questions such as: What does beauty has to do with, for instance, migration, climate change, mental or physical conditions? What is our understanding of aesthetics in relation to ethics? How do we tackle themes that lend themselves awkwardly to a presentation in the (critical) visual realm? Could the initiative be produced somehow else? Is new media and digital platforms following the concept and the execution or preceding it? Is the selection of artists or speakers leading to unexplored territories or consolidating an approach?

 

HYPERIMAGING!—Gjon Mili 2017: Award Exhibition/ 15 Edition

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on October 12, 2017

HYPERIMAGING!

Gjon Mili 2017: Award Exhibition/ 15 Edition

The opening ceremony will take place on Friday, October 13, 2017 at 20:00th at The National Gallery of Kosovo

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Mousse Magazine: Marinella Senatore “The School of Narrative Dance and Other Surprising Things” at MOSTYN, Llandudno

Posted in nEws and rEleases, Uncategorized by alcramer on May 7, 2017

http://moussemagazine.it/marinella-senatore-mostyn-2016/

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MOSTYN, Wales UK proudly presents the first solo exhibition in a British institution by Marinella Senatore.

The exhibition presents a selection of the artist’s work from 2009 to today, in a renewed form of installation which will enable visitor participation and active engagement. A special focus is dedicated to The School of Narrative Dance, an ongoing, touring project founded by the artist in 2013 which has received wide acclaim from the public in over ten countries around the world.

For the first time we present, in its original idea, RE:VERB—a multi-layered work consisting of seven videos intended for television broadcast, made with the people of Llandudno during the artist’s residency in North Wales in 2015. This work was commissioned by CALL, and made possible by the collaborative initiative and financial support of the Arts Council Wales Ideas:People:Places grant and Mostyn Estates Ltd.

This is the first solo exhibition of the artist in a British institution and is designed and developed as a panoramic look at her most recent production, and in particular on the increased attention by Senatore towards the involvement of communities. It exemplifies the powerful idea of rethinking places responsible for culture in a more dynamic way. At the same time promoting the active inclusion of the public in the creation and in the use of the artwork, it empowers the individual in relation to social structures and community-gathering systems.

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at MOSTYN, Llandudno
until 17 September 2016

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Marinella Senatore “The School of Narrative Dance and Other Surprising Things” installation views at MOSTYN, Llandudno, 2016

Photo: Dewi Lloyd

 

Regional arts venues: less out in the sticks, more out on a limb

Posted in nEws and rEleases, shortEssays/cortiSaggi [English/Italian] by alcramer on July 14, 2013

Running an arts space outside the city is challenging but, once you realise the range of your potential audience, rewarding too

Guardian Professional
5 July 2013

by Alfredo Cramerotti
Sliced Eye, Rubiks Cube, Flawless Skin, Cardiac Muscle Cell, Orion Nebula-M42, Snow Crystal, 2012

MOSTYN works to find imaginative solutions that draw in national and international visitors (even journalists) while retaining strong links with their local audience. Pictured work by Nikolaus Schletterer. Photograph: Nikolaus Schletterer/MOSTYN

 

As anyone who has worked in the sector will tell you, running an arts space outside major cities is a hugely rewarding experience, not least because of the challenges that arise from reaching out to an audience in ways that can’t rely on a ready-made critical mass of potential visitors in the immediate area.

MOSTYN is Wales‘ largest gallery dedicated to contemporary art with an audience of roughly 80,000 per year, but being located in the 18,000-strong Victorian sea town of Llandudno and surrounded by a predominately rural area brings with it issues that an equivalent metropolitan space might not need to consider so carefully.

Another part of the challenge is encouraging journalists to visit. The three hours direct train from central London is less an issue than the bias towards reviews focusing on galleries and events in the bigger cities. Obviously there is a responsibility for media to cover stories of interest to as wide an audience as possible, but responses range from “I don’t know where I’d put it” (the same review pages you would put any show on) to “we’re fully booked up covering a major event”.

It’s not that these exhibitions or events don’t warrant media attention, but major institutions and blockbuster events hardly need the publicity to encourage public interest.

So, how are we tackling these issues? Like many other organisations reliant on quality of programming, audience engagement, media coverage and visits to secure funding, we are working on finding imaginative solutions that draw in national and international visitors (even journalists) while retaining strong links with our local audience.

A key element of this is an ambitious curatorial programme featuring world known artists from Wolfgang Tillmans to Elizabeth Peyton. We’ve also initiated a major international exhibition programme including co-curating this year’s Wales in Venice show at the 55th Venice Biennale with Oriel Davies Gallery and the Arts Council Wales – an incredible platform for all involved.

Upcoming shows will draw on our history by inviting artists to indirectly respond, through their work, to the history of the MOSTYN building which has gone from being a gallery for female artists when it launched in 1901 to a WW1 drill hall and piano storage, before returning to a gallery space in 1979.

Partnership is a vital part of our engagement work, showcased by linking with initiatives such as the Artes Mundi visual arts exhibition and prize, the biggest in the UK at £40,000. We are also part of Plus Tate, a major UK network which includes 20 contemporary art organisations outside London.

Building on the success of last year’s Plus Tate-funded Ninjas initiative for 11 to 13-year-olds, we successfully applied to be one of five national partners to be part of Tate’s Circuit programme, a national youth network for the visual arts. Funded by the Paul Hamlyn Foundation, Cylch/Circuit seeks to spark a long-term transformation in the way that young people aged 15 to 25 engage with art and take control of their own learning.

The demographic here is older on average than in cities, and we are developing ways to include those who might not normally visit a contemporary art gallery through exhibitions and events which have a cross-art form approach.

For example, our current show YOU is a conceptually strong group show (Felix Gonzalez Torres, Aurélien Froment, Jeppe Hein, Július Koller, Rivane Neuenschwander) that questions the idea of what art is: the viewer ‘produces’ the artwork through their visit. It’s had an amazing response from families who would never think to visit an art gallery, lured in with an event outside the venue during the Llandudno Victorian Extravaganza when the town was heaving with visitors.

On a marketing level, besides the reviews and articles on specialised art press, particularly helpful are features on magazines, blogs and websites such as ThisIsTomorrow and WeHeart since they are bringing MOSTYN out into the eyeline of the style and culture conscious nationally and internationally.

What have we learned that might be useful for other organisations in a similar situation? Surely, understanding that an organisation such as ours does not have a single, cohesive public but multiple audiences (including our staff, not to forget) who demand attention and have different ways of engaging.

This is not to say that we have to please everyone, but we do have to have a firm strategic direction and a flexible range of delivery via the three main areas of exhibitions, engagement and learning – equally important and each with a dedicated curator and budget.

It’s also crucial to seek and establish a range of platforms and partners that match our values and make the most of our programme in space and time: from local residents, schools and higher education to wider partnerships across the country and abroad.

It’s a long-term strategy, and long-term planning matters for our exhibitions, partnerships and funding agreements alike. Currently we are planning well into 2017 but potentially, a cultural institution like a gallery should look into society 20 or 50 years from now and then work back.

 

Alfredo Cramerotti is the director of MOSTYN contemporary art gallery in Llandudno – follow it on Twitter @MOSTYN_Wales_

This content is brought to you by Guardian Professional.

Fernando Garcia-Dory & Radovan Kraguly exhibitions review on the BBC Wales website

Posted in nEws and rEleases by alcramer on November 7, 2012

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